Jason Smith

I'm Jason. This is my home on the web where I write. 

Apple Beats Samsung in Court and wins $1billion. Jury reached verdict quickly


Samsung now owe Apple $1b +  image:http://www.flickr.com/photos/hendry/
Apple have just been handed the verdict they wanted in the recent battle against Samsung in the US.

You can read a bit about the court case's info over at tech crunch.

But what does this mean for the future of the tech industry, and the smart phone sector in particular?

It's always amazing to see the comments in an article about Apple v Android, as people have often chosen sides without looking at the details.

So lets remind ourselves of the facts.



First, the headlines you see might imply Samsung copied the iPhone through and through. In fact, they have been found to have infringed only a handful of patents, over features that would not make the phone useless without.

Second, not every Samsung device has been found to have infringed. And not every Android device they made has been found to have infringed either. So they are not out of business or anything.

Third, Apple actually did offer to licence some, if not all, of the patent items to Samsung in the past, so there is a good chance Samsung will be able to use the features if they want in the future, for a small fee.

Some people have painted this result as a loss for innovation, but they must not know what it is to live in a world where you cannot own something you invent.

In China, where the saying "if you can get away with it, then do it" is the modus operandi, they have built a culture that does not much more than rip off other people's ideas, and has to pay their people a pittance so that they can compete in the world's market place. One would think that with one sixth of the world's people, they would be better represented in the tech innovation world, but sadly that isn't the case... yet.

The US and similar nations should be proud of it's patent system, and of the fact that people and companies, both large and small, can be rewarded and thus incentivised for coming up with something new and better.

At the end of the day, we all win if innovation and invention are protected. But sadly, who knows how many great ideas never saw the light of day because the people with the idea had no way to protect it, or no incentive to share it with the world.

Is the patent system broken like people say? It could use some improvement perhaps, and no-one likes a patent troll. Sadly, innocent people sometimes get put in jail. But that doesn't mean we get rid of the court system.

So what will change now because of this?

Probably not much. The newest Samsung phones that are out are probably not infringing at the moment, and if Apple have got any new and brilliant design they have been hiding until a time like this, they will feel a little more comfortable now putting it to market. You can expect more litigation from Apple against other manufacturers in the near term, but I expect they will settle out of court or licence their patents asap.


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